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PRAIRIE PLOWING
May 9, 1868, page 292 (Illustrated Article)
We remember years ago, when Illinois was a new State and its prairie lands were being sold at a bargain to induce emigration, hearing a practical farmer, who had been reading a description of the country, remark, "Why, thar arenít no stumps to plow around!" The generally prevailing impression in regard to prairie country is not unlike that of the old farmer; and it is believed by many emigrants to the West that farming on the prairies of the West is easy labor. The soil is undoubtedly rich, but it is no light labor to turn it. Such has been the experience at least of the multitudes of farmers who have followed the Pacific Railroad, and who are engaged in breaking land along that route. Our artist has given us a sketch of a farmer breaking soil for the first time on a Kansas prairie. The heavy sub-soil plows require three and four yoke of oxen to drag them through the tough, solid soil; and our illustration fully represents the difficulties of prairie plowing.

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